Thursday, August 08, 2013

          Profile: How Deborah Fink Bogaards '81 Got Tough

          The toughest courtroom battle of Debra Bogaards’ career had nothing to do with the case itself. The multimillion-dollar brain-injury suit she was defending was not unusually challenging; the witnesses were not contentious.

          The problem was the San Mateo judge presiding over the lengthy case: He interrupted Bogaards repeatedly and treated her with such disdain that she dreaded returning to court each day.

          “I persevered and was strong and ultimately won,” she says. The plaintiff, who sought $5 million, was awarded just $10,000. “Afterward, the entire jury came over and hugged me. Nobody, no judge, no bullying sociopathic attorney—and I’ve had those on the other side—can ever affect me to my core. It reinforced my inner strength.”

          Read more about Debra Bogaards in SuperLawyers here.

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