Tuesday, September 24, 2013

          Professor Robin Feldman on the Struggle of Universities to Make Patents Pay Off

          Feldman talks to Nature in this September 24, 2013 story on the trend of universities selling their unused patents to aggregators or "patent trolls."
          United States patent number 7,023,435 almost didn’t happen. The application, which covered a way of imaging a surface, was rejected four times by the US Patent and Trademark Office. But the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, which filed the patent, fought back — and prevailed in 2005.

          Robin FeldmanCaltech’s faith in the hard-won patent was not matched by industry: three years later, no one had licensed the rights to the invention. So in 2008, Caltech exclusively licensed it, along with 50 other patents, to a subsidiary of Intellectual Ventures, a company that has stockpiled 40,000 patents from which it collects US$3 billion in licensing income. The firm sometimes uses its patents to sue other companies for infringement, yet it rarely develops the inventions described by its intellectual property.

          Such patent-assertion entities, sometimes called aggregators, monetizers or ‘patent trolls’, are questionable homes for university inventions. But in the push to get academic research out of the ivory tower — and to make money — university technology-transfer offices are becoming less choosy about their partners.

          “As universities struggle to find revenue sources, one might worry that the monetization industry will be very tempting,” says Robin Feldman, director of the Institute for Innovation Law at the University of California Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco. There are already signs that this is happening, she adds. Last year, she published evidence that 45 universities around the world licensed or sold patents to Intellectual Ventures shell companies (T. Ewing and R. Feldman Stanford Technol. Law Rev. 1; 2012).

          Read the full story from Nature here.

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          Wednesday, September 28, 2016

          UC Hastings Visiting Scholar Professor Chen Taihe Fights for Human Rights and the Jury System

          After suffering detention in his homeland of China during the infamous “709 Crackdown,” Professor Chen hopes to start anew in the U.S. and prove that the American jury system is one of the best in the world.
          Monday, September 26, 2016

          New Faculty: Welcoming Nationally-Renowned Health Law Scholar Tim Greaney

          Greaney is co-author of the nation’s leading health law casebook, as well as a treatise and hornbook on health law. He has also published over 60 articles and chapters concerning antitrust law and health care law and policy, is regularly cited in the media, and has testified as an authority in these areas before the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives, the Federal Trade Commission, and the U.S. Senate.
          Thursday, September 22, 2016

          Mascot Tryouts?

          After 138 years of teaching law and producing first-class legal scholarship, we began to wonder if perhaps we are just a little too focused. Maybe we should look a little more like other institutions, with athletics programs and school mascots?
          Thursday, September 22, 2016

          Race and Policing Panel at UC Hastings

          Panel includes San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi, SFPD Interim Chief Toney Chaplin, UC Berkeley Prof. Nikki Jones, Former Director of the DOJ’s Community Service Relations Service Grande Lum, Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O’Malley, and UC Hastings Prof. Hadar Aviram.
          Wednesday, September 21, 2016

          Why Mozilla’s Head of Social Strategy Is Getting a Law Degree at UC Hastings

          Maura Tuohy enrolled in the MSL for Business and Technology Professionals to help forge an ethical future for tech.
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