Wednesday, October 22, 2014

          Jodie Allison Smith ‘14 Wins ABA Writing Award

          “Long Term Thinking in the Judiciary: Might Judges Mitigate Political Paralysis?” examines the judicial branch’s ability to bring long-term thinking into matters of public law.
          Sample alt tag.
          “Having a national body recognize my writing validates the possibility that I might have something useful to add about the role of the judiciary in governance. It adds one more hatch mark under my internal category of ‘Going to Law School was a Good Idea.’” - Jodie Allison Smith ‘14

          Jodie Allison Smith ‘14 won second place in a student writing competition sponsored by the Lawyers Conference of the Judicial Division of the American Bar Association.

          Smith is now waiting out her Bar results as a Litigation Bridge Fellow in the civil litigation division of the California Attorney General's Office. She plans to enter public law litigation after being admitted to the Bar.

          Her essay, titled “Long Term Thinking in the Judiciary: Might Judges Mitigate Political Paralysis?” addresses a nexus of issues and was initially an assignment for Professor David Jung's seminar on public policy. Harnessing her interest in the intersection of law and policy, she examines the judicial branch’s ability to bring long-term thinking into matters of public law, mitigating political paralysis on abiding issues like water security, nuclear proliferation, climate change and the mortgage crisis. She uses the microcosm of the Voting Rights Act case to illustrate how appointed federal judges might best employ the procedural tools they already possess.

          “My work and this paper are fundamentally about getting the public sector to do the work of governing well,” Smith said. “Ideology aside, people need government to provide basic things--clean water, safe food, education, adjudication of disputes, exercise of the police power--reliably and well, and that's what I put my professional energy behind.”

          The writing contest, which Smith learned about from Professor David Levine, was offered in connection with a symposium titled “Judicial Education and the Art of Judging: From Myth to Methodology.” Of her second place honor, Smith said “Having a national body recognize my writing validates the possibility that I might have something useful to add about the role of the judiciary in governance. It adds one more hatch mark under my internal category of ‘Going to Law School was a Good Idea.’”

          ###

          Go to News Archive

          Share this Story

          Share via Facebook
          Share via TwitterShare via EmailPrint Friendly Version

          Other Recent Stories/ RSS

          Friday, May 18, 2018

          UC Hastings Students Speak at UN Human Rights Council in Geneva

          Members of the Hastings Human Rights and International Law Organization attended the 37th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council to meet diplomats, engage in discussions on human rights issues, and deliver advocacy statements during proceedings.
          Wednesday, May 09, 2018

          Joseph W. Cotchett, Champion for Justice and Titan of the Plaintiffs Bar, is UC Hastings Law's 2018 Commencement Speaker

          Litigation Trial Lawyers Hall of Famer and UC Hastings Alumnus, Class of 1964, to keynote the College’s 137th Commencement
          Friday, May 04, 2018

          Blek le Rat, “The Godfather” of Stencil Graffiti, Contributes Installation at UC Hastings

          The innovative street artist is taking to the streets with works throughout San Francisco to promote a rare North American exhibition.
          Friday, May 04, 2018

          UC Hastings Professor Veena Dubal’s Work Plays Role in California Supreme Court Ruling

          “The Dynamex Decision” creates a major change in the landscape for California’s gig economy and follows the path of Professor Dubal’s analysis from her scholarly work.
          Wednesday, May 02, 2018

          Thinkers & Doers: April 2018

          Professor Dubal cited in the California Supreme Court’s Dynamex decision – Professor Aviram discusses “Sanctuary City” litigation outside the Ninth Circuit – Ellen DeGeneres asks Kamala Harris about 2020 presidential aspirations – How Asylum Works and Doesn’t Work – Professor Ball earns national recognition with 2018 Shanara Gilbert Award – Highlights from the Spring Soirée – and much more
          Go to News Archive