Tuesday, October 14, 2014

          5Qs for 3L Mario Lopez, Fall Intern at the White House

          Lopez works on financial and housing issues has enjoyed being at the heart of the executive branch.

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          "My legal education has benefited me in my current role by having a strong foundational knowledge of the rulemaking process." -3L Mario Lopez

          Q: Why did you get into law in the first place?

          A: I entered the legal profession in order to further develop my professional skills and have a better understanding of how law, the private sector, and government work together in our economy. 

          Q: What are your responsibilities as a White House Intern?

          A: As an intern in the National Economic Council, I work on financial regulatory and housing issues.  My responsibilities are to help research aspects of proposed policies and rules.  On housing, I help research how more consumers can become eligible to qualify for a mortgage. I research statutes, rules, and various state laws that affect housing credit markets.

          Q: What projects have been the most exciting to work on?

          A: The two most exciting projects that I have worked on are a policy recommendation memo regarding access to credit and an update on financial regulation reform policy recommendations.  While working on this project, I’ve interacted with HUD lawyers and stakeholders.

          Q: How has your legal education benefited you in this position?

          A: My legal education has benefited me in my current role by having a strong foundational knowledge of the rulemaking process. Law school, specifically my 1L statutory tax course, helped me understand what happens after a statute has been passed, and how federal agencies interpret the statute and implement rules. It has also helped in being able to take dense information and quickly summarize it in a memo.

          Q: Tell us something cool that has happened during your internship?

          A: A couple of things:  1) My co-interns and I were able to see the President and First Lady arrive on Marine One.  2) I was able to spend a few minutes with HUD Secretary Julian Castro, who is a former law school classmate of our Associate Academic Dean at Hastings, and also told me that he was a former White House Intern while at Stanford. 

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