Tuesday, October 14, 2014

          Bay Area Minority Law Student Scholarships Go to 1Ls Eliana Corona-Vazquez and Gabrielle Parris

          Professor Zitrin has contributed to several of the 19 scholarships awarded to UC Hastings students since 1998.

          Sample alt tag.
          Eliana Corona-Vazquez and Gabrielle Parris

          1L Gabrielle Parris is a first generation college student who attended Loyola University and worked with refugee communities in her hometown of Chicago.

          Now, she is not only attending law school, but plans to return to her work with the same communities after graduation.
           
          1L Eliana Corona-Vasquez recently interned at Bay Area Legal Aid’s Domestic Violence Prevention Project and plans to pursue family and immigration law.
           
          Both students received the Bay Area Minority Law Student Scholarship, a $10,000 award given by the Justice & Diversity Center of the Bar Association of San Francisco to select minority students attending law schools in the Bay Area. While law schools have worked hard to include more diversity of opinions and viewpoints, minorities are still underrepresented in the legal profession. As a result, the Bay Area Minority Law Student Scholarship Program seeks to balance the social injustices and financial hardships which may prevent some people from attending law school. The program was established in 1998, when all University of California schools ended race-based admissions, and seeks to ensure racial diversity in the law profession.
           
          Both Corona-Vazquez and Parris emphasized the importance of the scholarship in reducing their law school debt burden and allowing them more choice in post-law school options.
           
          “Receiving the Bay Area Minority Scholarship is not only helping me make my dreams of becoming an immigration attorney come true, but is also allowing me to choose the type of career I want to focus on without forcing me to solely think about how I will pay off my debt,” said Corona-Vazquez.
           
          Professor Richard Zitrin, a Lecturer of Law who specializes in legal ethics, has funded at least five of these minority scholarships given out by the Bar Association through the Arthur & Charlotte Zitrin Foundation, named for his parents. Professor Zitrin also recently endowed a $200,000 scholarship trust named after Shanna Bradford, an attorney who received one of the first Bay Area Minority Law Student Scholarships, and passed away in 2009.
           
          Zitrin has authored three books on legal ethics and helped to draft federal and California Sunshine in Litigation Acts—which would prevent lawyers from “secretizing” information important to the public health and safety by a secret settlement agreement or stipulated protective order—a measure that has the potential for broad impact on consumer protection and safety. He is also the principal drafter of the so-called “ethics professors’ letter” to the California Supreme Court, signed by 55 California teachers of legal ethics, urging the Court to reject a series of lawyer-protective rules.  On September 19, the Court rejected the proposed rules in their entirety and asked the State Bar to form a new commission, which Zitrin called “a great victory for public and pro-client accountability.”

          In his pro bono efforts, Professor Zitrin attempts to choose the cases on the side of the individual against a seemingly insurmountable bureaucracy where cost is a big factor, such as Social Security and immigration cases. 

          The same concern for equality motivates Professor Zitrin’s involvement in the Bay Area Minority Law Student Scholarship Program, which helps to ensure diversity in the classroom and the courtroom. He’s not only a donor, but he serves as the chair of the scholarship committee.

          “I’m very fortunate to be in the position to contribute to these scholarships, and now to endow a second scholarship.  Diversity among our lawyers is not a matter of political correctness, but far more importantly, a way of increasing the wealth of our collective experience and knowledge, making us better lawyers and better people,” said Zitrin.

          Go to News Archive

          Share this Story

          Share via Facebook
          Share via TwitterShare via EmailPrint Friendly Version

          Other Recent Stories/ RSS

          Thursday, April 20, 2017

          Legalized: Aaron Herzberg ’95 is at the forefront of California’s budding cannabis industry.

          2L Jeremy Schwartz, President of UC Hastings Law Students for Sensible Drug Policy, interviews the divorce attorney turned marijuana real estate entrepreneur and dispensary owner.
          Tuesday, April 18, 2017

          UC Hastings Courtside: 3L Tom Lin Externs at the Supreme Court of California

          With the goal of becoming a first-generation attorney, Tom served as a judicial extern to the Hon. Goodwin H. Liu and Hon. Ming W. Chin, Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of California.
          Monday, April 10, 2017

          Healing and Trust: Students Organize Public Hearing for the San Francisco Human Rights Commission

          The “rebellious” Community Group Advocacy and Social Justice Lawyering Group Clinic students strive to create dialogue around the current state of community-police relations and take steps toward building a safer community.
          Friday, April 07, 2017

          Judge Jed S. Rakoff to Keynote 136th UC Hastings Law Commencement

          Prominent legal thinker and scholar hailed as “a legal hero of our time” by Rolling Stone, and among “The World’s 50 Greatest Leaders” by Fortune.
          Thursday, April 06, 2017

          Thinkers & Doers: March 2017

          The Californian who tried to fix Washington -- TRIAL TEAM IS #1 -- Clean Water Regulation Rollbacks -- Big Whistle-Blower Lawsuit Win -- “Defender” Documentary -- Boutique Suing Ivanka Trump -- The Endangered Antiquities Act -- and much more
          Go to News Archive