Thursday, February 12, 2015

          CGRS Releases Book-Length Regional Study on Children and Migration

          The Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at UC Hastings has released a new study: Childhood, Migration, and Human Rights.
          Sample alt tag.
          Unprecedented in scope, Childhood and Migration in Central and North America: Causes, Policies, Practices and Challenges is the result of a two-year regional investigation into the treatment of Honduran, Salvadoran, Guatemalan, Mexican, and United States citizen and permanent resident children affected by migration.

          The Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at UC Hastings is proud to announce its new book-length study on children affected by migration in the Northern Central America–Mexico–United States corridor.

          CGRS and the Center for Justice and Human Rights at the National University of Lanús, Argentina directed the study in partnership with civil society organizations in each of the five countries examined. The book assesses root causes of the forced migration of children and families, and analyzes relevant regional and binational accords. The authors conclude that laws, policies, and practices throughout the region systematically violate the human rights of migrant children and children of migrant parents.

          The book calls upon Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, and the United States to reform laws and policies and to develop a regional response to protect the rights of children affected by migration. These include children’s rights to life, safety, family, development, due process, and international protection, and to have their best interests considered as a primary factor in all decisions affecting them.

          CGRS Associate Director and Managing Attorney Lisa Frydman, a specialist in immigrant children’s rights and asylum law, explains, “Rather than focus on increasing immigration enforcement in Mexico and the United States, the countries of the region should concentrate on addressing violence and other drivers of migration, ensuring full and fair access to asylum and other forms of relief, and upholding human rights.”

          The full report is available here. A press release from CGRS with detailed contact information is available here. For media inquiries, please contact Lisa Frydman, frydmanl@uchastings.edu, or Karen Musalo, musalok@uchastings.edu, Director of the Center for Gender & Refugee Studies at UC Hastings College of the Law.


          ###

          Go to News Archive

          Share this Story

          Share via Facebook
          Share via TwitterShare via EmailPrint Friendly Version

          Other Recent Stories/ RSS

          Friday, November 17, 2017

          Exciting New Spring 2018 Courses Focus on the Future

          Grabbing from the headlines and emphasizing innovation, courses like Legal Tech Startups, Advanced Immigration Law, and Stalking and Law will prepare UC Hastings students for next-level legal careers.
          Tuesday, November 14, 2017

          Port pilot John Betz ’96 discusses his non-legal career and the importance of education

          A tragic “Deadliest Catch” moment piqued a lifelong interest in the law and encouraged John to pursue a law degree at UC Hastings.
          Friday, November 03, 2017

          Thinkers & Doers: October 2017

          100 Things Warriors Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die -- Alum appointed Chargé d’Affaires -- The poisonous dynamic over who’s to blame for racism -- Prof. Williams on the Harvey Weinstein Effect -- Two More UC Hastings Grads Receive Judgeships from Gov. Brown -- Jury selection in the Steinle case -- and much more
          Wednesday, November 01, 2017

          Why do drug prices remain so high?

          "Because drug companies block competition," says Professor Feldman in a new study that examines all drugs on the market between 2005 and 2015, identifying and analyzing every instance in which the company added new patents or exclusivities. 
          Wednesday, October 25, 2017

          UC Hastings Community Offers Legal Help to Wine Country Wildfire Victims

          “I'd been reading stories in the news, and it was devastating. It bothered me not doing anything about it—I just wanted to do something for the families,” says 2L Trang Luong.
          Go to News Archive