Monday, February 09, 2015

          UC Hastings Announces Three New Faculty Hires

          Three new scholar-teachers will join the ranks of the UC Hastings faculty in the 2015-2016 academic year.
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          Effective July 1, 2015, Professor Dave Owen, previously of the University of Maine School of Law, will join the UC Hastings faculty as a full professor with tenure. Professor Zachary Price, who is completing a two-year Visiting Assistant Professorship with UC Hastings, will become a permanent full-time faculty member. And Veena Dubal, who has a PhD in Jurisprudence and Social Policy and a JD from UC Berkeley, will also become a full-time faculty member.

          “UC Hastings’ faculty is packed with respected scholars who are also accomplished teachers,” says Provost & Academic Dean Elizabeth L. Hillman. “These three hires will fit in perfectly, each filling a curricular need, each a well-established scholar who is dedicated to teaching and mentoring. We are delighted to welcome Professors Dubal, Owen, and Price to UC Hastings.”

          About Veena Dubal

          Associate Professor Veena Dubal has a JD and a PhD from UC Berkeley, where she was a Fulbright Scholar, a Berkeley Empirical Legal Studies Fellow, and a Graduate Fellow at the Center for Research on Social Change. She is currently completing a year as a post-doctoral fellow at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University.

          Professor Dubal’s research focuses primarily on law and social change in the context of work law. Her experiences as a public interest lawyer and as a socio-legal scholar allow her to better understand the role that the law plays in both creating and addressing economic, political, and social inequalities.  

          In her dissertation, a three year ethnography, she examined the work lives and worker collectivities of taxi drivers in San Francisco. Her research suggests that conventional wisdom on lawyering on behalf of low-income independent contractors needs to be re-examined and re-configured based on the desires and everyday realities of these workers.  

          Professor Dubal looks forward to continuing her research and scholarship on how new technologies of work in the "sharing economy" impact the lived experiences of workers and how legal interventions can address the rise of precarious labor.   

          “I'm thrilled to be teaching employment law during a time when the new work economy is rapidly shifting,” Dubal says. “UC Hastings students and graduates will no doubt play a vital role in addressing the future regulation of work, and in doing so, they will have a tremendous impact on economic equality in the U.S. I look forward to being a part of that process.”

          Professor Dubal’s teaching interests include Employment/Labor Law, Employment Discrimination, Law and Society, and Critical Legal Studies.

          About Dave Owen

          Professor Dave Owen has been on the faculty of the University of Maine School of Law since 2007, serving as Associate Dean for Research for the past two years. He graduated Order of the Coif from UC Berkeley Boalt Hall, and is a nationally recognized expert in Environmental Law.

          Although his research covers a variety of environmental law topics, Professor Owen’s primary emphasis is water resource management. He has recently studied innovations in hydropower and river restoration policy, clashes between groundwater use regulation and the takings clause, and the impact of the public trust doctrine on California freshwater management. He focuses on issues with national or global implications, with much of his research inspired by his years as a California water lawyer.  

          Professor Owen’s current scholarly project examines what regional federal offices do, particularly in the environmental realm, and why they matter to debates about federalism and administrative law.  

          “For someone interested in water resource management,” Professor Owen says, “there is no better place to work (or study) than California in general and UC Hastings in particular. There are many reasons I'm excited to be back in the Bay Area, but the chance to be in the thick of one of the most creative environmental law scenes in the world is the biggest.”

          Professor Owen’s teaching interests include Environmental Law, Administrative Law, Legislation and Administration, Natural Resources Law, and Water Resources Law.

          About Zachary Price

          After completing a Fulbright Scholarship in Copenhagen, Associate Professor Zachary Price graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School. He completed three impressive clerkships, first with the US District Court for the District of Maryland; then with the DC Circuit Court of Appeals; and finally with Justice Anthony M. Kennedy of the United States Supreme Court. He worked as an appellate litigator in private practice and served for three years in the U.S. Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel, a prestigious legal office that resolves difficult legal and constitutional questions for the executive branch.

          Professor Price’s scholarly work focuses on questions of constitutional structure related to civil and criminal law enforcement. His most recent publication, Enforcement Discretion and Executive Duty, 67 Vand. L. Rev. 671 (2014), considered the extent of executive authority to decline enforcement of federal laws – an issue central to recent controversies over immigration and marijuana enforcement policies, delays implementing the Affordable Care Act, and Bush Administration environmental enforcement practices. His article has been discussed in Slate, the Washington Post, and the New England Journal of Medicine, as well as in scholarly publications.

          In other prior work, Professor Price has addressed the criminal jurisdiction of territorial governments and Native American tribes, the proper interpretation of criminal statutes, and the extent of congressional authority to treat states unequally in federal legislation. His current work focuses on judicial authority to review and overturn executive non-enforcement policies.

          “UC Hastings has a stellar faculty and dynamic student body, located just steps from state and federal courts in one of the world’s most exciting cities,” says Professor Price. “I’ve loved teaching at UC Hastings as a visitor and I’m thrilled to be joining the regular faculty.”

          Professor Price teaches constitutional law, civil procedure, and related subjects.

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