Monday, June 01, 2015

          Professor Musalo Wins Lawyer of the Year Award

          The Immigration Law Section of the Federal Bar Association (FBA) recognized her achievement.

          Sample alt tag.

          Professor Karen Musalo received the Lawyer of the Year award from the Immigration Law Section of the Federal Bar Association (FBA) in May at the group’s annual conference.

          The award recognizes the work of Musalo and the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies (CGRS) to ensure the legal protection of asylum for immigrant women fleeing domestic violence. Musalo has litigated key cases on this issue, and under her leadership, the CGRS was a vital source of legal advice and technical assistance to attorneys representing women fleeing violence in their home countries. She led efforts to share legal strategies and litigation support materials, and CGRS filed numerous amicus briefs on cases supporting women seeking asylum. After years of advocacy by the CGRS on behalf of these cases, in August of 2014 a decision by the Board of Immigration Appeals issued a binding precedent on the issue.


          SHARELINE: “She is the type of leader hatching away at the thicket with her axe," Prof. Musalo is #lawyeroftheyear @CGRS - http://ctt.ec/Jbb6d+


          “This award is very meaningful to me,” said Musalo. “I am quite honored that the work I have done is recognized and valued by both government and non-governmental attorneys.”

          The Federal Bar Association (FBA) is comprised of over 15,000 private and government attorneys and judges whose goal is to serve the interests and needs of the federal legal profession and the public. The Immigration Law Section focuses specifically on the promotion of successful practice, constructive discussion and continued development of immigration law.

          This was the inaugural year of the FBA’s Immigration Law Section Awards Committee, making Professor Musalo the first winner of their Lawyer of the Year award.

          “We are extremely honored to present this award to Professor Musalo. She embodies the spirit of the Refugee Convention as it was originally envisioned. She is the type of leader who bursts out exploring through the unknown, hatching away at the thicket with her axe,” said Alicia Triche, Chair of the Awards Committee for the Immigration Law Section of the FBA.

          Go to News Archive

          Share this Story

          Share via Facebook
          Share via TwitterShare via EmailPrint Friendly Version

          Other Recent Stories/ RSS

          Wednesday, April 25, 2018

          3 New Reasons Why UC Hastings LL.M. Program Continues to Excel

          From a Startup Legal Garage track to welcoming a Global Programs Advisor see the latest from UC Hastings College of the Law's LL.M. program
          Friday, April 20, 2018

          UC Hastings Demonstration Gardens Continues Its Legacy at McCoppin Hub and Throughout the Community

          As the Demonstration Gardens makes room for a new LEED Platinum academic building at 333 Golden Gate Avenue, it remains a part of the UC Hastings community and fortifies the tradition of sustainability for the Long Range Campus Plan.
          Friday, April 20, 2018

          UC Hastings Trial Team Wins National Championship

          3Ls Pablo Wudka-Robles, Maryam Ahmad, Jon Davidi, and 2L Ellie Barczak outperformed the other regional winners to emerge victorious at the AAJ National Student Trial Advocacy Competition in Raleigh, North Carolina.
          Thursday, April 19, 2018

          Matt Edling '07 Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

          A groundbreaking ruling in the lawsuits he filed on behalf of California cities and counties may allow climate liability cases to be heard in state courts.
          Thursday, April 19, 2018

          Shadowy World of Drug Pricing—An Inside Look

          New research by University of California Hastings Law Professor Robin Feldman shines light on the highly secretive world of drug prices, including hidden payments, rebates, and inducements that drive the system toward higher-priced drugs.
          Go to News Archive