Wednesday, August 19, 2015

          5 Questions for 2L Amanda Depuy

          2L and incoming President of the Black Law Students Association talks about her summer internship.
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          2L Amanda Depuy has always had a passion for sports, business and the law.

          This summer her internship with the San Jose Sharks professional hockey team allowed her to combine all three of those areas. We caught up with Depuy to talk about her internship working with one of the top sports teams in the Bay Area and advice she has for anyone pursuing a legal career.

          Q: How has it been to work with the San Jose Sharks?

          A: I have loved working with the San Jose Sharks this summer. I am learning everything from employment law to contract drafting and even antitrust! Learning all these new and exciting types of law has helped me decide what I want to do next summer, which will allow me to simplify the Early Interview Process (EIP) for next year. I wasn’t sure what it was going to be like working in-house my first summer, but I would recommend it to all 1Ls who are interested in working at a firm. In-house counsels run lean, which means the interns are exposed to a lot of things and are given more responsibility than you might get as a 1L summer intern at a firm. Also, it’s great to see first-hand what the clients’ needs are, and I think that knowledge will ultimately benefit anyone who is looking to work at a firm post graduation.

          Q: Can you talk about some of the legal skills you used this summer?

          A: One of the most important skills I’ve used is research. While it is easy to depend on your professors to give you the cornerstone cases in Legal Writing and Research and moot court, research is one of the principal skills you should perfect to be successful during summer internships. Of course you have to be a good writer, but if you can’t find the substance for your memo, being a good writer won’t matter. Networking is also a skill that has really helped me this summer. The people who have the confidence to walk up to a complete stranger and strike up a conversation at a networking event would have the confidence to approach the leaders in a company to get assistance on projects.  Lastly, I think the back and forth mental checking that you use on a law school exam is a very translatable skill. Yes, in the real world you are clearly on one side of the argument, but the only way to successfully craft an argument is to anticipate the opposing side’s counterarguments and preempt them.

          Q: What is your passion?

          A: I am passionate about a lot of things like sports and business, but I think the thing I am most passionate about is diversifying the legal profession. That is why I will be co-President of the Black Law Student Association (BLSA) next year. I want to help foster a sense of community on campus for diverse students. Often, students coming from a diverse background are the first in their family to go to law school, sometimes the first in their family to go to college. I think that diversity in the legal field is wonderful but it doesn’t happen without effort - it takes support from organizations like BLSA, La Raza, APALSA, and other groups to make sure that diverse students aren’t going through this law school journey alone.


          Tweet: "UC Hastings stresses the need for students to have 'hustle'." - 2L Amanda Depuy on what sets @UCHastingsLaw apart. http://ctt.ec/5aDr1+

          Q: What is the best advice anyone has ever given you? And what advice would you give someone who is just starting a career in law?

          A: The best advice anyone has ever given me is that there isn’t just one path to your dream; there is the path that you can clearly see and the path that is less visible. It doesn’t matter which path you actually take.  They all end at your dream, so just make sure you take one of them. The advice I’d give to someone beginning a legal career is to apply for everything, even the things that you “know” you won’t get. Every position needs to be filled, and the only way to actually know you won’t get something is to apply for it.

          Q: In your opinion, what sets UC Hastings apart?

          A: To me, the two things that set UC Hastings apart from other law schools is our extensive alumni network and our determination to succeed. There are alumni in every practice field you could ever imagine. In a profession where networking is as important as grades, coming from a strongly connected school is extremely beneficial. Secondly, UC Hastings stresses the need for students to have “hustle”. Students here have been job searching from the very beginning of December and continued that search well into May when needed. Because UC Hastings students never expect to be given anything and fight hard, we often times end up in more fitting summer placements than our friends at more prestigious schools. This sense of determination that UC Hastings fosters really sets the school apart. 

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