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Hastings Alumni Mag-Spring 2014

was published in the journal Neuroscience. Flood then worked for three years in a lab at MIT, investigating genetic risk factors for psychiatric disorders. As a JD candidate, Flood is interested in the intersection of criminal law and behavioral psychology. “I always knew UC Hastings was a good school,” Flood says, “and the Consortium is really interesting.” For 2L Foram Dave, who has also been published in a medical journal, UC Hastings’ patent law program was the primary draw. After working for a medical device company after college, she decided to pursue a JD, having already seen just how complicated—and crucial—patent law is to the science world. In addition to patent law, UC Hastings also offers a health law concentration that includes proximity to the city’s startup world, or its specialized offerings in health care and patent law and its affiliation with UCSF, UC Hastings is becoming a magnet for law students who have backgrounds in science and engineering. In fact, just under 10 percent of incoming students over the past three years hold some kind of science degree, according to Greg Canada, UC Hastings’ assistant dean of admissions. “We’ve definitely seen a bump,” he says. “A number of things contribute to that: One is our intellectual property and health law programs, certainly, in addition to all the tech firms in this area with a growing interest in biotech.” Zachary Flood, another first-year student, points to the school’s location as one of the biggest reasons he applied here. He was also attracted to its strong patent law program and the UCSF/UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science, and Health Policy, which pairs law and medical students in joint research, training, and service programs at the two campuses. Flood graduated from UC Santa Barbara with a degree in biopsychology. As an undergraduate, he led a study on brain growth dynamics that courses in disability and elder law, food and drug law, plus bioethics and public health law. The school’s science-to-law writing program offers help in the area where science students often need it the most: learning to write for a legal audience. Professor David Faigman, who co-directs the Consortium, observes that UC Hastings has “become a leader where law and science meet.” He says, “Whether students are interested Students have the opportunity to work with premier researchers blazing new paths in interdisciplinary understanding. It is a very dynamic time to be working in law and science, and, in particular, it is exciting to be doing this work at UC Hastings. —P ROF E S SOR D AV I D FA I GMA N in intellectual property, neuroscience, forensic psychiatry, or any other specialty area, they have the opportunity to work with premier researchers blazing new paths in interdisciplinary understanding.” It is, he says, “a very dynamic time to be working in law and science, and, in particular, it is very exciting to be doing this work at UC Hastings.” “ ” UC HASTINGS 11


Hastings Alumni Mag-Spring 2014
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