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Hastings Alumni Mag-Spring 2014

{ IN BRIEF } IMPLICIT BIAS AT WORK Professor Joan C. Williams offers strategies to help women confront workplace challenges Women are stalling out in their advance to the highest levels of the workplace because “implicit bias is still pervasive,” says Professor Joan C. Williams, director of UC Hastings’ Center for WorkLife Law. “I decided to give women concrete strategies for navigating workplaces—not as we wish they were but as we find them.” Williams does just that in What Works for Women at Work: Four Patterns Working Women Need to Know (NYU Press 2014), co-authored with Rachel Dempsey, her daughter. The book draws on outcomes of hundreds of studies and insights from new research—127 interviews with women at the top of their fields. Williams and Dempsey offer a guide for managing on-the-job challenges: constant demands to prove yourself, the tightrope between being too masculine and too feminine, the wall in promotions when motherhood beckons, and conflicts among female co-workers. The advice is intergenerational, humorous, candid—and doable. Booklist said, “What Works for Women at Work is filled with street-smart advice and plain old savvy about the way life works in corporate America.” As Anne-Marie Slaughter observes in the book’s foreword, “Men should read this book to understand; women should read this book to act.” Feldman Testifies in Congress In November 2013, Professor Robin Feldman testified before the House Committee on Energy & Commerce about the effects of patent monetization entities, known as trolls. She returned to Washington, D.C., to brief Senate staffers working on patent reform legislation. Earlier this year, Feldman filed an amicus brief in Alice Corporation v. CLS Bank. It was the third amicus brief Feldman filed with the U.S. Supreme Court in recent months. This year, the high court has the most active patent docket it has had for decades. “It is an extraordinary moment in patent law history, with all three branches of government focusing on patent reform.” —PROFESSOR ROBIN FELDMAN 12 SPRING 2014 J AY M A L L I N


Hastings Alumni Mag-Spring 2014
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