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Hastings Alumni Mag-Spring 2014

{ ENTERPRISE } UC HASTINGS 25 understood the nuances in the difference between California and Delaware law, which was important since we incorporated in California, and most of the available legal corporate agreement templates were for Delaware law.” The students also immersed themselves in Skive it’s mission. “We’re a very technology-driven company, and our technology is not that easy to understand,” Mohan explains. “We have a unique business model and complex licensing needs. The students understood it.” On-the-Job Training, Before the Job Now that he’s a practicing lawyer, Masterson realizes how close the Skive it work was to actual practice. “We did cuttingedge work with heavy demands,” he says. “I learned the nature of client service—that you have to get it right and be responsive. It was the most applicable work I did in law school.” For Campos, who is now an associate at DLA Piper in Palo Alto, the Startup Legal Garage taught him critical soft skills as well. “Startup founders live and breathe the work they do, and 100 percent of their attention is devoted to the startup,” he says. “It can be a challenging task for lawyers, who aim to be responsive. There’s an element of managing expectations.” Campos also learned that client service extends not just to companies but to the senior associates supervising him. “Having that real-world experience prepared me for my job,” Campos says. “I wasn’t jumping in cold as a new associate.” Because of help from the Startup Legal Garage, Skive it has grown from three co-founders to a staff of eight and has launched its Web portal with mobile applications and platform in beta. Today, Skive it is ready for funding from angel investors and venture capital firms. Feldman credits UC Hastings’ “nimble administration” for allowing the Startup Legal Garage to get off the ground quickly. Not surprisingly, she’s received calls from other law schools wanting to learn about the program. Currently, 25 students work there, with four times as many applying. To that end, Feldman is looking for resources to expand the program. Expanding Innovation James Gunderson ’81 spearheads efforts to support the Institute for Innovation Law James Gunderson ’81 first heard about UC Hastings’ Institute for Innovation Law at a conference on partnerships between universities and corporate research and development departments. He was impressed, and after discussing the project further with the institute’s director, Professor Robin Feldman, he was sold. Now, he’s trying to sell others on it, too. As the institute has grown to incorporate the school’s Law and Bioscience (LAB) Project, the Privacy and Technology Project, and programs relating to bio-entrepreneurship and business law, a need for a full-time senior fellow has emerged. Together, Gunderson and alumni, including Ron Dolin ’09 and Frank Busch ’00, have already raised more than half of the money needed to fund the position, and Gunderson is reaching out to others in an effort to secure the rest. Support for this program is also provided by the Blackstone Charitable Foundation and the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. Students in the Institute for Innovation Law have the opportunity to work with UCSF scientists and tech startups to evaluate the potential of various intellectual property cases. “This sort of practical experience for law students can help confirm their interest in the field,” Gunderson says, “and it informs their studies with the comprehension that helps them develop as effective IP lawyers.” “ This sort of practical experience for law students can help confirm their interest in the field.” —James Gunderson ’81


Hastings Alumni Mag-Spring 2014
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