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Hastings Alumni Mag-Spring 2014

{ ENTERPRISE } UC HASTINGS 33 Certainly, special skills are required to work in technology internationally. Dean Fealk ’00, head of global equity for DLA Piper, reveals his passion for his work when he describes those skills. “It’s both rewarding and challenging to “There is no better place than UC Hastings to launch a legal career in the international technology sector. ” —Dean Fealk ’00 solve nuanced problems that require a varied tool kit. International issues demand that you wrap the tact of a diplomat over the tactics of a strategist,” he says. “And when technology is at the core, you should also apply the heart of an entrepreneur and the vision of a futurist.” UC Hastings alumni working in the international tech sector give their alma mater high marks for the preparation they received. Fealk says UC Hastings is an ideal springboard. “As the leading law school in the city that is both at the heart of the technology revolution and at the gateway to the Asia-Pacific economy,” he says, “there is no better place to launch a legal career in the international technology sector.” Alumni report that learning the language of the country a student would like to work in is crucial. “If you want to develop an international practice, the best advice I have is to go do it,” says Matthew Hult ’98, who represented technology clients for Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe in Taipei for more than a decade before going inhouse at Intel. “What I mean by that is learn the language and the culture of another country if you don’t know them already, so when you work with your international colleagues, you can build bridges of trust. I have seen extremely smart people fail internationally because they did not do these basic human things to deepen trust.” “If I were a student starting right now,” says McMurray at Samsung, “I would immediately pick a language and make a commitment to learning it. Then a UC Hastings degree will multiply that extra talent by a thousand times. Taken together, it’s a way to differentiate yourself.” And as Edward Dhong ’96, regional counsel for IBM in Seoul, explains, a technology background puts job candidates ahead, even for positions that are not exclusively in the tech area. “If I had two otherwise equal candidates, technology exposure would be one of the factors I would consider,” Dhong says, adding that what fuels his own interest in technology is its inherent innovation. “I didn’t know a company this large could move so quickly and be so innovative,” he says. Referring to his legal training at UC Hastings as “solid,” Dhong says he has made introductions for other UC Hastings graduates to meet the “ample opportunities for good lawyers” that exist abroad, both in-house and at international legal firms. According to McMurray, the international tech sector has a great need for lawyers who understand the technology world. “I’m a guy who understands the technology guys,” he says. “I can help them bridge the gap, communicate their ideas, and protect their interests. It’s fun to be part of that.”


Hastings Alumni Mag-Spring 2014
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