Social Justice Lawyering

The Social Justice Lawyering concentration prepares students to make a positive impact on the world by serving under-represented clients and communities.

Overview

The Social Justice Lawyering concentration prepares students to make a positive impact on the world by serving under-represented clients and communities. Students attracted to this concentration come from diverse communities and perspectives, but all share a strong desire for a career that aligns with their values. This shared sense of calling to address issues of social justice builds a strong, supportive, enduring community that helps sustain concentrators as they enter and pursue this work.

The concentration offers an array of more than 100 classes that are taught by over thirty full-time UC Hastings faculty, as well as adjunct faculty who include some of the nation’s preeminent public interest lawyers.

Hands-on work is an important component of this concentration: Every student in the concentration must take a clinical course or externship—and many take more than one. And they must also take at least one class on negotiation and one on the impact of race in our society.

A year-long seminar in the second year brings students and faculty together to explore what it means to be a social justice lawyer. This intensive experience connects like-minded peers and connects them with faculty and alumni, forging relationships that will support students as they move forward as alums to change the world.

How to Enroll

To enroll in the Social Justice Lawyering Concentration, students must before the start of second year complete a Concentrated Studies Application, get Professor Piomelli’s signature on it, piomelli@uchastings.edu, and enroll in the year-long concentration seminar for 2L students.

Advisor: Professor Ascanio Piomelli

MINIMUM TOTAL UNITS REQUIRED: 17

Qualifying Coursework

The list of courses within the categories is up to date as of the publication of this posting. New courses are sometimes added to the curriculum subsequent to publication. Therefore, if a student finds a course in the curriculum not listed, but which the student thinks might count toward concentration requirements, the student should check with the concentration advisor regarding the eligibility of the course to satisfy concentration requirements.