Reuel
Schiller

Professor of Law

Biography

Professor Reuel Schiller’s teaching and scholarship focuses on American legal history, administrative law, and labor and employment law. He has written extensively about the legal history of the American administrative state, and the historical development of labor law and employment discrimination law. His most recent book, Forging Rivals: Race, Class, Law, and the Collapse of Postwar Liberalism (Cambridge University Press, 2015), won the American Society for Legal History’s John Phillip Reid Award and was an Honorable Mention for the Law and Society Association’s J. Willard Hurst Award. Schiller has also received the American Bar Association, Administrative Law Section’s scholarship award and the Rutter Award for Teaching Excellence.

In addition to his teaching and scholarship, Professor Schiller is a co-editor of Cambridge University Press’s Studies in Legal History book series, and the convener of the American Society for Legal History’s Johnson Fellowship for first book authors. He is also serves on the editorial board of the Law and History Review.

Professor Schiller studied history as an undergraduate at Yale College. His obtained his law degree and history Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. After college he worked for the City of New York on immigration, criminal justice, education, and civil rights policy. After graduating from law school, he clerked for Judge J. Frederick Motz of the United States District Court for the District of Maryland. Following his clerkship, he was a Samuel I. Golieb Fellow in Legal History at New York University School of Law and a Louis Prashker Teaching Fellow at St. John’s University School of Law.

A native New Yorker, Professor Schiller lives in Albany, CA, with his wife, Jane Williams, and their children.

Expertise

Education

  1. University of Virginia Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 1997

    Ph.D., History

  2. University of Virginia Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 1990

    M.A., History

  3. University of Virginia School of Law 1993

    J.D., Law

  4. Yale University 1988

    B.A., History

Selected Scholarship

  1. An Unexpected Antagonist: Courts, Deregulation, and Conservative Judicial Ideology 01/2013

    Making Legal History: Essays in Honor of William E. Nelson

  2. Singing the 'Right-to-Work Blues': The Politics of Race in the Campaign for 'Voluntary Unionism' in Post-War California 01/2012

    The Right and Labor in America: Politics, Ideology, and Imagination

  3. 'It is Not Wisdom, but Authority that Makes a Law:' A Historical Perspective on the Problem of Creating a Restatement of Employment Law 04/2009

    Employee Rights and Employment Policy Journal

  4. The Administrative State, Front and Center: Studying Law and Administration in Postwar America 01/2008

    Law and History Review

  5. The Era of Deference: Courts, Expertise, and the Emergence of New Deal Administrative Law 12/2007

    Michigan Law Review

  6. 'Saint George and the Dragon': Courts and the Development of the Administrative State in Twentieth-Century America 01/2005

    New Directions in Policy History

  7. The Emporium Capwell Case: Race, Labor Law, and the Crisis of Post-War Liberalism 01/2004

    Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law

  8. Reining in the Administrative State: World War II and the Decline of Expert Administration 01/2002

    Total War and the Law: The American Home Front in World War II

  9. Rulemaking's Promise: Administrative Law and Legal Culture in the 1960s and 1970s 01/2001

    Administrative Law Review

  10. Enlarging the Administrative Polity: Administrative Law and the Changing Definition of Pluralism, 1945-1970 10/2000

    Vanderbilt Law Review

  11. Free Speech and Expertise: Administrative Censorship and the Birth of the Modern First Amendment 02/2000

    Virginia Law Review

  12. From Group Rights to Individual Liberties: Post-War Labor Law, Liberalism, and the Waning of Union Strength 01/1999

    Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law

  13. The Strawhorsemen of the Apocalypse: Relativism and the Historian as Expert Witness 04/1998

    Hastings Law Journal

Courses

  1. Constitutional History: Race
  2. Constitutional History: Framing
  3. Labor Law