Zachary
Price

Associate Professor of Law

Biography

Professor Zachary Price began teaching at UC Hastings as a Visiting Assistant Professor in 2013, following a one-year fellowship at the Stanford Law School Constitutional Law Center. He has been an Associate Professor at UC Hastings since 2015.

Before entering academics, Professor Price served for three years as an attorney in the Office of Legal Counsel, a component of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. that provides authoritative legal advice to the President, Attorney General, and executive branch agencies. He has also worked as a litigator in private practice and clerked at all three levels of the federal judiciary, for Judge Catherine C. Blake of the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland, Judge David S. Tatel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy of the U.S. Supreme Court. He graduated from Harvard Law School magna cum laude in 2003 and from Stanford University with honors and distinction in 1998.

Professor Price’s research focuses on questions of constitutional structure. His interests include constitutional law, civil procedure, statutory interpretation, and federal Indian law. His work has appeared in the Vanderbilt Law Review, Columbia Law Review, New York University Law Review Online, and Fordham Law Review.

Expertise

Education

  1. Harvard Law School 2003

    J.D. (Magna Cum Laude), Law

  2. Stanford University 1998

    With Honors and Distinction, Humanities

Selected Scholarship

  1. Funding Restrictions and Separation of Powers 03/2018

    Vanderbilt Law Review

  2. Our Imperiled Absolutist First Amendment 04/2018

    University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law

  3. Reliance on Nonenforcement 04/2017

    William & Mary Law Review

  4. Seeking Baselines for Negative Authority: Constitutional and Rule-of-Law Arguments Over Nonenforcement and Waiver 05/2016

    Journal of Legal Analysis

  5. Law Enforcement as Political Question 04/2016

    Notre Dame Law Review

  6. Enforcement Discretion and Executive Duty 04/2014

    Vanderbilt Law Review

  7. Dividing Sovereignty in Tribal and Territorial Criminal Jurisdiction 03/2013

    Social Sciences Research Network

  8. Namudno's Non-Existent Principle of State Equality 01/2013

    New York University Law Review

  9. The Rule of Lenity as a Rule of Structure 03/2004

    Fordham Law Review

Courses

  1. Civil Procedure
  2. Constitutional Law
  3. Constitutional Law II